rightEarnest money shows you’re serious
Typically when an offer to purchase a house is made, you, as the buyer, will also pay an “earnest money” deposit.  This deposit shows the seller that you’re serious about the offer to purchase the property. 

The amount of earnest money deposit varies based on the type of property being purchased and local market conditions.  As your real estate professional, I’ll help you determine the appropriate amount to pay as an earnest money deposit.

The sales contract will dictate who holds the earnest money.  Usually the seller’s real estate agent will deposit the earnest money in a trust or escrow account until closing.   At closing, the earnest money is applied to the purchase price.

In the event the sale doesn’t close, the sales agreement generally spells out the conditions under which you would forfeit the earnest money.  Generally if the seller meets all the terms of the contract, the seller will keep the earnest money.  If the seller does not meet the terms of the contract, you, as the buyer, may receive a total or partial refund of the earnest money. 

 

 

 

 

How much earnest money is enough?

That depends on whether you're the buyer or the seller. Contact Marilyn to learn how you can you can minimize your "at risk" dollars if you're a buyer, and if you're a seller, how best to protect yourself from a buyer who defaults and damages you.

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